Surgeries made by dentist in France

Dental surgery is any of a number of medical procedures that involve artificially modifying dentition; in other words, surgery of the teeth and jaw bones.

More frequent than usual cleaning and examination may be necessary during the treatment of many different dental/oral disorders or due to recent surgical procedures such as dental implants. The American Dental Association (ADA) stresses that the frequency of dental visits necessary is dependent upon the needs of each individual with some able to go once or twice a year and others needing to go more often. This may include yearly, select dental X-rays. See also dental plaque identification procedure and removal.

Dentists inject anesthetic to block sensory transmission by the alveolar nerves. The superior alveolar nerves are not usually anesthetized directly because they are difficult to approach with a needle. For this reason, the maxillary teeth are usually anesthetized locally by inserting the needle beneath the oral mucosa surrounding the teeth. The inferior alveolar nerve is probably anesthetized more often than any other nerve in the body. To anesthetize this nerve, the dentist inserts the needle somewhat posterior to the patient’s last molar.

Next, these are the kinds of dental surgeries you can expect French dentists ( GEOALLO Dentiste Garde ) to perform:

Periapical surgery

If an infection develops in a tooth after it has had root canal treatment and the problem is related to failure of the root canal treatment, there are three choices to manage the problem.

The root canal treatment can be redone, the tooth can be removed, or periapical surgery can be performed. Redoing the root canal can be a good option but extensive dental work on the tooth or the presence of a post placed in the canal can make it difficult. For example, removal of the post can result in fracture of the root. If the root is fractured for any reason, repair is not possible and the tooth must be removed. The diagnosis of a root fracture can be a diagnostic challenge as it may not be visible on an X-ray.

Periapical surgery is statistically a very successful procedure if the problem is a leaky root canal filling and the root tip is surgically accessible. Generally, this is a painless procedure performed under local anesthesia. An incision is made and the root tip exposed. If a cyst or granuloma is present, it will be removed and possibly biopsied. The infection and inflammatory tissue will be removed and the tooth root inspected. If no fracture or other irreparable problem is found, a filling will be placed at the root tip to seal the canal. Dissolvable stitches are then placed. Swelling and pain postoperatively are usually minimal.

Orthognathic surgery

Corrective jaw surgery, also called orthognathic surgery, is performed by an oral and maxillofacial surgeon (OMS) to correct a wide range of minor and major skeletal and dental irregularities, including the misalignment of jaws and teeth. Surgery can improve chewing, speaking and breathing. While the patient’s appearance may be dramatically enhanced as a result of the surgery, orthognathic surgery is performed to correct functional problems.

Some of the conditions that may indicate the need for corrective jaw surgery are:

  • Difficulty chewing or biting food
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Chronic jaw or jaw joint (TMJ) pain and headaches
  • Excessive wear of the teeth
  • Open bite (space between the upper and lower teeth when the mouth is closed)
  • Unbalanced facial appearance from the front or side
  • Facial injury
  • Birth defects
  • Receding lower jaw and chin
  • Protruding jaw
  • Inability to make the lips meet without straining
  • Chronic mouth breathing
  • Sleep apnea (breathing problems when sleeping, including snoring)

Your dentist, orthodontist and OMS will work together to determine whether you are a candidate for orthognathic surgery. The oral and maxillofacial surgeon determines which corrective jaw surgical procedure is appropriate and performs the actual surgery. It is important to understand that your treatment, which will probably include orthodontics before and after surgery, may take several years to complete. Your OMS and orthodontist understand this is a long-term commitment for you and your family, and they will try to realistically estimate the time required for your treatment.

Pre-Prosthetic Surgery

Pre-prosthetic surgery is the preparation of your mouth before the placement of a prosthesis. Before placing a complete or partial denture, some patients require minor oral surgical procedures to ensure an optimal level of comfort and success. Because the denture sits on the bone ridge, it is essential that the bone is the proper size and shape. As part of your pre-prosthetic surgery in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Dr. Daniel Cannon may recommend one or more of the following procedures:

  • Bone ridge reduction
  • Bone smoothing and reshaping
  • Exposure of impacted teeth
  • Removal of excess bone
  • Removal of excess gum tissue

If a tooth has been extracted prior to the placement of the prosthesis, the underlying bone may be left uneven and sharp. The bone might then need to be smoothed and reshaped in order to provide maximum comfort and the best possible fit. In some cases, excess bone would need to be removed prior to denture placement. During your visit to Cannon Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, our experienced oral surgeon will examine your smile and determine which of these procedures would best meet your specific needs. If you are having a complete or partial denture inserted, we welcome you to contact our office today to learn more about pre-prosthetic surgery and its benefits.

Dental implant surgery

Dental implant surgery is a procedure that replaces tooth roots with metal, screw like posts and replaces damaged or missing teeth with artificial teeth that look and function much like real ones. Dental implant surgery can offer a welcome alternative to dentures or bridgework that doesn’t fit well.

How dental implant surgery is performed depends on the type of implant and the condition of your jawbone. Dental implant surgery may involve several procedures. The major benefit of implants is solid support for your new teeth, a process that requires the bone to heal tightly around the implant. Because this healing requires time, the process can take many months.

Dental implants are surgically placed in your jawbone, where they serve as the roots of missing teeth. Because the titanium in the implants fuses with your jawbone, the implants won’t slip, make noise or cause bone damage the way that fixed bridgework or dentures might. And the materials can’t decay like your own teeth that support regular bridgework can.

In general, dental implants may be right for you if you:

  • Have one or more missing teeth
  • Have a jawbone that’s reached full growth
  • Have adequate bone to secure the implants or are able to have a bone graft
  • Have healthy oral tissues
  • Don’t have health conditions that will affect bone healing
  • Are unable or unwilling to wear dentures
  • Want to improve your speech
  • Are willing to commit several months to the process

Like any surgery, dental implant surgery poses some health risks. Problems are rare, though, and when they do occur they’re usually minor and easily treated. Risks include:

  • Infection at the implant site
  • Injury or damage to surrounding structures, such as other teeth or blood vessels
  • Nerve damage, which can cause pain, numbness or tingling in your natural teeth, gums, lips or chin
  • Sinus problems, when dental implants placed in the upper jaw protrude into one of your sinus cavities

To control pain, anesthesia options during surgery include local anesthesia, sedation or general anesthesia. Talk to your dental specialist about which option is best for you. Your dental care team will instruct you about eating and drinking before surgery, depending on what type of anesthesia you have. If you’re having general anesthesia, plan to have someone take you home after surgery and expect to rest for the remainder of the day.

The entire process can take many months from start to finish. Much of that time is devoted to healing and waiting for the growth of new bone in your jaw.

If your jawbone isn’t thick enough or is too soft, you may need bone grafting before you can have dental implant surgery. That’s because the powerful chewing action of your mouth exerts great pressure on your bone, and if it can’t support the implant, the surgery likely would fail. A bone graft can create a more solid base for the implant.

In bone grafting, a piece of bone is removed from another part of your jaw or your body, your hip for example, and transplanted to your jawbone. Another option is to use artificial bone (bone commercially available) to place in these areas. It may take several months for the transplanted bone to grow enough new bone to support a dental implant.

During surgery to place the dental implant, your oral surgeon makes a cut to open your gum and expose the bone. Holes are drilled into the bone where the dental implant metal post will be placed. Since the post will serve as the tooth root, it’s implanted deep into the bone.

At this point, you’ll still have a gap where your tooth is missing. A type of partial, temporary denture can be placed for appearance, if needed. You can remove this denture for cleaning and while you sleep.

Once the metal implant post is placed in your jawbone, osseointegration begins. During this process, the jawbone grows into and unites with the surface of the dental implant. This process, which can take several months, helps provide a solid base for your new artificial tooth just as roots do for your natural teeth.

When osseointegration is complete, you may need additional surgery to place the abutment, the piece where the crown will eventually attach. This minor surgery is typically done with local anesthesia in an outpatient setting.

To place the abutment:

  • Your oral surgeon reopens your gum to expose the dental implant
  • The abutment is attached to the dental implant
  • The gum tissue is then closed around, but not over, the abutment

In some cases, the abutment is attached to the dental implant metal post when the post is implanted. That means you won’t need an extra surgical step. Because the abutment juts past the gumline, however, it’s visible when you open your mouth, and it will be that way until your dentist completes the tooth prosthesis. Some people don’t like that appearance and prefer to have the abutment placed in a separate procedure.

After the abutment is placed, your gums must heal for one or two weeks before the artificial tooth can be attached. Once your gums heal, you’ll have more impressions made of your mouth and remaining teeth. These impressions are used to make the crown, your realistic-looking artificial tooth. The crown can’t be placed until your jawbone is strong enough to support use of the new tooth.

You and your dental specialist can choose artificial teeth that are either removable, fixed or a combination of both.

  • Removable. This type is similar to a conventional removable denture. It contains artificial white teeth surrounded by pink plastic gum. It’s mounted on a metal frame that’s attached to the implant abutment, and it snaps securely into place. It can be easily removed for repair or daily cleaning.
  • Fixed. In this type, an artificial tooth is permanently screwed or cemented onto an individual implant abutment. You can’t remove the tooth for cleaning or during sleep. If affordability isn’t a concern, you can opt to replace several missing teeth this way. Most of the time, each crown is attached to its own dental implant. However, because implants are exceptionally strong, several teeth can be replaced by one implant if they’re bridged together.

Most dental implants are successful. Sometimes, however, the bone fails to fuse sufficiently to the metal implant. Smoking, for example, can contribute to implant failure and complications.

If the bone fails to fuse sufficiently, the implant is removed, the bone is cleaned up, and you can try the procedure again in two or three months.

You can help your dental work, and remaining natural teeth, last longer if you:

  • Practice excellent oral hygiene. Just as with your natural teeth, keep implants, artificial teeth and gum tissue clean. Specially designed brushes, such as an interdental brush that slides between teeth, can help clean the nooks and crannies around teeth, gums and metal posts.
  • See your dentist regularly. Schedule regular dental checkups to ensure the health and proper functioning of your implants.
  • Avoid damaging habits. Don’t chew hard items, such as ice and hard candy, which can break your crowns or your natural teeth. Avoid tooth-staining tobacco and caffeine products. Get treatment if you grind your teeth.